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Ozone
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Ozone
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O3
Ozone

Physical Properties

Under solid (grey), liquid (blue) and vapor states (white) along the equilibrium curves

  • General properties
  • Solid phase
  • Liquid Phase
  • Gas Phase
(P)
log(P)
Download
  • Molecular weight
    47.998
    g/mol
  • Content in air
    /

Critical Point

  • Temperature
    - 12.15
    °C
    10.13 °F 261 K
  • Pressure
    55.7
    bar
    5.57E6 pa 807.8599 lbf/in2 54.9716 Atm 5570 Kpa 4.1779E4 mmHg
  • Density
    539.31
    kg/m³
    33.6679 lb/ft³

Triple Point

  • Temperature
    - 193
    °C
    - 315.4 °F 80.15 K
  • Pressure
    7.346E-6
    bar
    7.346E-1 pa 1.0654E-4 lbf/in2 7.2499E-6 Atm 7.346E-4 Kpa 5.51E-3 mmHg
Pressure 1.013 bar
  • Melting point
    - 193
    °C
    - 315.4 °F 80.15 K
  • Latent heat of fusion (at melting point)
    41.668
    kJ/kg
    17.926 Btu/lb 9.9589 kcal/kg
  • Solid density
    /
Pressure 1.013 bar
  • Liquid density
    1349.08
    kg/m³
    84.2201 lb/ft³
  • Boiling point
    - 111.3
    °C
    - 168.34 °F 161.85 K
  • Latent heat of vaporization (at boiling point)
    288.49
    kJ/kg
    124.1116 Btu/lb 68.9508 kcal/kg
Pressure1.013barTemperature
  • Compressibility factor Z
    /
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  • Cp/Cv ratio γ
    /
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    /
  • Dynamic viscosity
    1.3923E-4
    Po
    13.9228 µPa.s 1.3923E-5 PA.S 9.3557E-6 lb/ft/s
    1.4569E-4
    Po
    14.5685 µPa.s 1.4569E-5 PA.S 9.7896E-6 lb/ft/s
    1.4996E-4
    Po
    14.9961 µPa.s 1.4996E-5 PA.S 1.0077E-5 lb/ft/s
  • Gas density at boiling point
    /
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  • Gas density
    2.154
    kg/m³
    1.3447E-1 lb/ft³
    2.154
    kg/m³
    1.3447E-1 lb/ft³
    2.154
    kg/m³
    1.3447E-1 lb/ft³
  • Heat capacity at constant pressure Cp
    /
    /
    /
  • Heat capacity at constant volume Cv
    /
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    /
  • Liquid (at boiling point)/gas equivalent
    626.31
    mol/mol
    626.31
    mol/mol
    626.31
    mol/mol
  • Solubility in water
    /
    /
    /
  • Specific gravity
    /
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  • Specific volume
    /
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  • Thermal conductivity
    17.889
    mW/m∙K
    1.0343E-2 Btu/ft/h/°F 1.5392E-1 cal/hour∙cm∙°C 4.2756E-5 cal/s∙cm∙°C 1.7889E-2 W/(m∙K)
    19.068
    mW/m∙K
    1.1025E-2 Btu/ft/h/°F 1.6407E-1 cal/hour∙cm∙°C 4.5574E-5 cal/s∙cm∙°C 1.9068E-2 W/(m∙K)
    19.854
    mW/m∙K
    1.1479E-2 Btu/ft/h/°F 1.7083E-1 cal/hour∙cm∙°C 4.7452E-5 cal/s∙cm∙°C 1.9854E-2 W/(m∙K)
  • Vapor pressure
    /
    /
    /
O3
Ozone

Liquid / Gas Volumes

Calculate a liquid or gas volume or a mass

Liquid Phase

At boiling point at 1.013 bar

m3(Volume)
kg(Mass)

Gas Phase

at 1.013 bar and boiling point

m3(Volume)
kg(Mass)
O3
Ozone

Applications

Examples of uses of this molecule in Industry and Healthcare

Food

Ozone allows to disinfect water used for fish farming, food manufacturing and sanitation.

Food

Other

Ozonated water is used to sanitize surfaces and disinfect products. Ozone is also used for swimming pools, spa, laundry, odor control, etc.

Waste & Water management

Ozone is used to decrease Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) of waste water. Ozone permits to obtain good decolorization of waste water effluents.

Waste & Water management

Pulp & Paper

Ozone allows environment-friendly paper pulp bleaching. Ozone is used to reduce the residual fluorescence coming from the optical whiteners of the waste papers. It is also used to treat specific effluents.

Pharma & Biotech

Ozone is used in chemical synthesis and for treatment of wastewater.

Pharma & Biotech

Electronic components

Ozone is used to oxidize materials such as silicon to silicon dioxide. It is also used to ash photoresists. Ozone allows to achieve Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) of oxides.

Electronic components
O3
Ozone

Safety

Information to safely use this molecule

  • Major hazards
  • Material compatibility
  • GHS03
    Oxidising
  • GHS05
    Corrosive
  • GHS06
    Acute Toxicity

Metals

  • Aluminium
    no data
  • Brass
    no data
  • Monel
    no data
  • Copper
    no data
  • Ferritic Steel
    no data
  • Stainless steel
    no data
  • Zinc
    no data
  • Titanium
    no data

Plastics

  • Polytetrafluoroethylene
    no data
  • Polychlorotrifluoroethylene
    no data
  • Polyvinylidene fluoride
    no data
  • Polyvinyl chloride
    no data
  • Ethylene tetrafluoroethylene
    no data
  • Polycarbonate
    no data
  • Polyamide
    no data
  • Polypropylene
    no data

Elastomers

  • Buthyl (isobutene- isoprene) rubber
    no data
  • Nitrile rubber
    no data
  • Chloroprene
    no data
  • Chlorofluorocarbons
    no data
  • Silicon
    no data
  • Perfluoroelastomers
    no data
  • Fluoroelastomers
    no data
  • Nitrile rubber
    no data
  • Neoprene
    no data
  • Polyurethane
    no data
  • Ethylene-Propylene
    no data

Lubricants

  • Hydrocarbon based lubricant
    no data
  • Fluorocarbon based lubricant
    no data

Materials compatibility

Recommendations : Air Liquide has gathered data on the compatibility of gases with materials to assist you in evaluating which materials to use for a gas system. Although the information has been compiled from what Air Liquide believes are reliable sources (International Standards: Compatibility of cylinder and valve materials with gas content; Part 1- Metallic materials: ISO11114-1 (March 2012), Part 2 - Non-metallic materials: ISO11114-2 (April 2013), it must be used with extreme caution and engineering judgement. No raw data such as these can cover all conditions of concentration, temperature, humidity, impurities and aeration. It is therefore recommended that this table is only used to identify possible materials for applications at high pressure and ambient temperature. Extensive investigation and testing under the specific conditions of use need to be carried out to validate a material selection for a given application. Contact the regional Air Liquide team for expertise service.

O3
Ozone

Learn More

General information

More information

Ozone was discovered in 1789 by Martin van Marum, however Christian Friedrich Schönbein is considered as the father of ozone. Its name comes from the Greek word "ozein", meaning "smell". Ozone is formed by the combination of three oxygen atoms. Ozone is an unstable gas with a strong and irritating odor (which explains its name), corrosive, very toxic and a strong oxidant. Ozone is generally produced by generating high-power electrical discharges in air or in oxygen. Naturally found in the upper layers of the atmosphere, where it is formed by a photo-chemical reaction, ozone serves as a shield which protects our planet from the sun's ultraviolet radiation.