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Oxygen
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Oxygen
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O2
Oxygen

Physical Properties

Under solid (grey), liquid (blue) and vapor states (white) along the equilibrium curves

  • General properties
  • Solid phase
  • Liquid Phase
  • Gas Phase
(P)
log(P)
Download
  • Molecular weight
    31.999
    g/mol
  • Content in air
    2.0946E5
    ppm
    2.0946E5 ppm 20.946 vol/% 2.0946E-1 vol/vol

Critical Point

  • Temperature
    - 118.57
    °C
    - 181.426 °F 154.58 K
  • Pressure
    50.43
    bar
    5.043E6 pa 731.425 lbf/in2 49.7705 Atm 5043 Kpa 3.7826E4 mmHg
  • Density
    436.14
    kg/m³
    27.2273 lb/ft³

Triple Point

  • Temperature
    - 218.79
    °C
    - 361.822 °F 54.36 K
  • Pressure
    1.5E-3
    bar
    150 pa 2.1756E-2 lbf/in2 1.4804E-3 Atm 0.15 Kpa 1.1251 mmHg
Pressure 1.013 bar
  • Melting point
    - 218.78
    °C
    - 361.804 °F 54.37 K
  • Latent heat of fusion (at melting point)
    13.876
    kJ/kg
    5.9696 Btu/lb 3.3164 kcal/kg
  • Solid density
    /
Pressure 1.013 bar
  • Liquid density
    1141.2
    kg/m³
    71.2426 lb/ft³
  • Boiling point
    - 182.96
    °C
    - 297.328 °F 90.19 K
  • Latent heat of vaporization (at boiling point)
    213.05
    kJ/kg
    91.6565 Btu/lb 50.9202 kcal/kg
Pressure1.013barTemperature
  • Compressibility factor Z
    9.9903E-1
    9.9924E-1
    9.9935E-1
  • Cp/Cv ratio γ
    1.3991
    1.3977
    1.3967
  • Dynamic viscosity
    1.9143E-4
    Po
    19.143 µPa.s 1.9143E-5 PA.S 1.2864E-5 lb/ft/s
    1.9993E-4
    Po
    19.993 µPa.s 1.9993E-5 PA.S 1.3435E-5 lb/ft/s
    2.055E-4
    Po
    20.55 µPa.s 2.055E-5 PA.S 1.3809E-5 lb/ft/s
  • Gas density at boiling point
    4.468
    kg/m³
    2.7893E-1 lb/ft³
    4.468
    kg/m³
    2.7893E-1 lb/ft³
    4.468
    kg/m³
    2.7893E-1 lb/ft³
  • Gas density
    1.4287
    kg/m³
    8.9191E-2 lb/ft³
    1.354
    kg/m³
    8.4527E-2 lb/ft³
    1.3085
    kg/m³
    8.1687E-2 lb/ft³
  • Heat capacity at constant pressure Cp
    9.1672E-1
    kJ/(kg.K)
    2.191E-1 BTU/lb∙°F 916.716 J/kg∙K 2.191E-1 kcal/kg∙K
    9.1822E-1
    kJ/(kg.K)
    2.1946E-1 BTU/lb∙°F 918.216 J/kg∙K 2.1946E-1 kcal/kg∙K
    9.1962E-1
    kJ/(kg.K)
    2.198E-1 BTU/lb∙°F 919.622 J/kg∙K 2.198E-1 kcal/kg∙K
  • Heat capacity at constant volume Cv
    6.5521E-1
    kJ/(kg.K)
    1.566E-1 BTU/lb∙°F 655.208 J/kg∙K 1.566E-1 kcal/kg∙K
    6.5702E-1
    kJ/(kg.K)
    1.5703E-1 BTU/lb∙°F 657.021 J/kg∙K 1.5703E-1 kcal/kg∙K
    6.5846E-1
    kJ/(kg.K)
    1.5738E-1 BTU/lb∙°F 658.458 J/kg∙K 1.5738E-1 kcal/kg∙K
  • Liquid (at boiling point)/gas equivalent
    798.77
    mol/mol
    843.57
    mol/mol
    872.14
    mol/mol
  • Solubility in water
    /
    2.756E-4
    mol/mol
    2.293E-5
    mol/mol
  • Specific gravity
    1.11
    1.11
    1.11
  • Specific volume
    0.7
    m³/kg
    11.2129 ft³/lb
    7.385E-1
    m³/kg
    11.8296 ft³/lb
    7.643E-1
    m³/kg
    12.2429 ft³/lb
  • Thermal conductivity
    24.35
    mW/m∙K
    1.4079E-2 Btu/ft/h/°F 2.0951E-1 cal/hour∙cm∙°C 5.8198E-5 cal/s∙cm∙°C 2.435E-2 W/(m∙K)
    25.55
    mW/m∙K
    1.4772E-2 Btu/ft/h/°F 2.1984E-1 cal/hour∙cm∙°C 6.1066E-5 cal/s∙cm∙°C 2.555E-2 W/(m∙K)
    26.34
    mW/m∙K
    1.5229E-2 Btu/ft/h/°F 2.2664E-1 cal/hour∙cm∙°C 6.2954E-5 cal/s∙cm∙°C 2.634E-2 W/(m∙K)
  • Vapor pressure
    /
    /
    /
O2
Oxygen

Liquid / Gas Volumes

Calculate a liquid or gas volume or a mass

Liquid Phase

At boiling point at 1.013 bar

m3(Volume)
kg(Mass)

Gas Phase

at 1.013 bar and boiling point

m3(Volume)
kg(Mass)
O2
Oxygen

Applications

Examples of uses of this molecule in Industry and Healthcare

Aeronautics

Oxygen is used for oxygen masks, in aeronautics for civil and military planes.

Aeronautics

Automotive

Oxygen is used for laser cutting and oxycutting.

Automotive

Chemicals

Oxygen improves yield of a large number of petrochemical processes: chemical oxidation reactions such as the production of ethylene oxide, propylene oxide, etc ; air-based processes debottlenecking; synthesis gas (dihydrogen/carbon monoxide) production.

Chemicals

Electronic components

Oxygen is used to oxidize materials such as silicon to silicon dioxide. Oxygen is used to ash photoresists. It allows to achieve Chemical Vapor Deposition of oxides (CVD).

Electronic components

Waste & Water management

Oxygen enhances waste water treatment (sludges, odors, energy, etc.). It also improves waste treatment, decreasing the amount of incineration emissions. It is also used in ozone production for oxidations or cleaning.

Waste & Water management

Food

Oxygen is used to oxygenate fish-breeding tanks. It maintains colour of fresh red meat products with Modified Atmosphere Packaging (MAP). Oxygen prevents anaerobic conditions of fresh fish and seafood products with Modified Atmosphere Packaging (MAP).

Food

Glass

Oxygen limits nitrogen oxides emission through oxycombustion processes.

Glass

Hospital care

Drug: oxygen is used to correct hypoxic (inadequate tissue oxygenation) related diseases.

Hospital care

Laboratories & Research Centers

Oxygen is used in calibration gas mixtures for petrochemical industry, environmental emission monitoring, industrial hygiene monitors and trace impurity analyzers. It is also used to measure calorimetric properties of hydrocarbons or coal and of oxidation reactions.

Laboratories & Research Centers

Metal

Oxygen is used at blast furnace, basic oxygen furnace, electric arc furnace in iron and steel making. It is also used in smelters and converters in the non-ferrous industry.

Metal

Metal fabrication

Oxygen improves iron, steel and non-ferrous metals production processes : decarburization of hot metals, enrichment of blast furnace air, primary production, secondary melting, etc. It is also used for laser cutting and oxycutting.

Metal fabrication

Oil & Gas

Oxygen enriches regeneration air of Fluid Cracking Catalytic units (FCC) and Sulfur Removal Unit (SRU) in refinery.

Oil & Gas

Other

Oxygen participates in bleaching operations to obtain a more environmentally friendly process, essentially during the delignifying step.

Space

Liquid oxygen is used as propellant for rockets launch.

Space

Pharma & Biotech

Oxygen participates to chemical synthesis. It is used to enrich air during fermentation, as well as to treat wastewater. Oxygen is also used to flame seal glass ampuls for finished products.

Pharma & Biotech
O2
Oxygen

Safety

Information to safely use this molecule

  • Major hazards
  • Material compatibility
  • GHS04
    Gas under pressure
  • GHS03
    Oxidising

Odor

none

Metals

  • Aluminium
    Satisfactory
  • Brass
    Satisfactory
  • Monel
    Satisfactory
  • Copper
    Satisfactory
  • Ferritic Steel
    Satisfactory
    possible corrosion if water
  • Stainless steel
    Satisfactory
  • Zinc
    Satisfactory
  • Titanium
    no data

Plastics

  • Polytetrafluoroethylene
    Acceptable
    possible ignition under certain conditions and risk of release of toxic vapor in extreme conditions (elevated temperature)
  • Polychlorotrifluoroethylene
    Acceptable
    possible ignition under certain conditions and risk of release of toxic vapor in extreme conditions (elevated temperature)
  • Polyvinylidene fluoride
    Acceptable
    possible ignition under certain conditions and risk of release of toxic vapor in extreme conditions (elevated temperature)
  • Polyvinyl chloride
    Acceptable
    possible ignition under certain conditions and risk of release of toxic vapor in extreme conditions (elevated temperature)
  • Ethylene tetrafluoroethylene
    no data
  • Polycarbonate
    Acceptable
    possible ignition under certain conditions
  • Polyamide
    Acceptable
    possible ignition under certain conditions
  • Polypropylene
    Acceptable
    possible ignition under certain conditions

Elastomers

  • Buthyl (isobutene- isoprene) rubber
    Acceptable
    possible ignition under certain conditions
  • Nitrile rubber
    Acceptable
    possible ignition under certain conditions
  • Chloroprene
    Acceptable
    possible ignition under certain conditions and risk of release of toxic vapor in extreme conditions (elevated temperature)
  • Chlorofluorocarbons
    Acceptable
    possible ignition under certain conditions, risk of release of toxic vapor in extreme conditions (elevated temperature) and significant swelling
  • Silicon
    Acceptable
    possible ignition under certain conditions
  • Perfluoroelastomers
    Acceptable
    depends on condition of use
  • Fluoroelastomers
    Acceptable
    depends on condition of use
  • Nitrile rubber
    Acceptable
    depends on condition of use
  • Neoprene
    Acceptable
    depends on condition of use
  • Polyurethane
    Satisfactory
  • Ethylene-Propylene
    Acceptable
    possible ignition under certain conditions

Lubricants

  • Hydrocarbon based lubricant
    Not recommended
    risk of explosion and fire
  • Fluorocarbon based lubricant
    Acceptable
    possible ignition under certain conditions and risk of release of toxic vapor in extreme conditions (elevated temperature)

Materials compatibility

Recommendations : Air Liquide has gathered data on the compatibility of gases with materials to assist you in evaluating which materials to use for a gas system. Although the information has been compiled from what Air Liquide believes are reliable sources (International Standards: Compatibility of cylinder and valve materials with gas content; Part 1- Metallic materials: ISO11114-1 (March 2012), Part 2 - Non-metallic materials: ISO11114-2 (April 2013), it must be used with extreme caution and engineering judgement. No raw data such as these can cover all conditions of concentration, temperature, humidity, impurities and aeration. It is therefore recommended that this table is only used to identify possible materials for applications at high pressure and ambient temperature. Extensive investigation and testing under the specific conditions of use need to be carried out to validate a material selection for a given application. Contact the regional Air Liquide team for expertise service.

O2
Oxygen

Learn More

General information

More information

Oxygen was discovered in 1774 by Joseph Priestley. In 1777, Antoine Laurent de Lavoisier renamed "vital air" into "oxygene", from the Greek "-ὀξύς" (oxys), "acid" and "-γενής" (-genes), "producer", literally "begetter". It is the most abundant element on the earth’s surface. For example, oxygen makes up (by weight) 46 % of the Earth's crust (oxides, silicates, etc.), 89 % of the Earth's water and 62 % of the human body (in the form of molecules). In its most well-known form, it constitutes 21 % of the atmosphere. It is a tasteless, odorless and colorless gas, essential to life.