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Argon
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Argon
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Ar
Argon

Physical Properties

Under solid (grey), liquid (blue) and vapor states (white) along the equilibrium curves

  • General properties
  • Solid phase
  • Liquid Phase
  • Gas Phase
(P)
log(P)
Download
  • Molecular weight
    39.948
    g/mol
  • Content in air
    9340
    ppm
    9340 ppm 9.34E-1 vol/% 9.34E-3 vol/vol

Critical Point

  • Temperature
    - 122.46
    °C
    - 188.428 °F 150.69 K
  • Pressure
    48.63
    bar
    4.863E6 pa 705.3182 lbf/in2 47.9941 Atm 4863 Kpa 3.6476E4 mmHg
  • Density
    535.6
    kg/m³
    33.4363 lb/ft³

Triple Point

  • Temperature
    - 189.34
    °C
    - 308.812 °F 83.81 K
  • Pressure
    6.87E-1
    bar
    6.87E4 pa 9.9641 lbf/in2 6.7802E-1 Atm 68.7 Kpa 515.2938 mmHg
Pressure 1.013 bar
  • Melting point
    - 189.37
    °C
    - 308.866 °F 83.78 K
  • Latent heat of fusion (at melting point)
    29.588
    kJ/kg
    12.7291 Btu/lb 7.0717 kcal/kg
  • Solid density
    /
Pressure 1.013 bar
  • Liquid density
    1395.4
    kg/m³
    87.1118 lb/ft³
  • Boiling point
    - 185.85
    °C
    - 302.53 °F 87.3 K
  • Latent heat of vaporization (at boiling point)
    161.14
    kJ/kg
    69.3242 Btu/lb 38.5134 kcal/kg
Pressure1.013barTemperature
  • Compressibility factor Z
    9.9906E-1
    9.9925E-1
    9.9937E-1
  • Cp/Cv ratio γ
    1.6702
    1.6698
    1.6696
  • Dynamic viscosity
    2.1017E-4
    Po
    21.017 µPa.s 2.1017E-5 PA.S 1.4123E-5 lb/ft/s
    2.1987E-4
    Po
    21.987 µPa.s 2.1987E-5 PA.S 1.4775E-5 lb/ft/s
    2.2624E-4
    Po
    22.624 µPa.s 2.2624E-5 PA.S 1.5203E-5 lb/ft/s
  • Gas density at boiling point
    5.772
    kg/m³
    3.6033E-1 lb/ft³
    5.772
    kg/m³
    3.6033E-1 lb/ft³
    5.772
    kg/m³
    3.6033E-1 lb/ft³
  • Gas density
    1.7835
    kg/m³
    1.1134E-1 lb/ft³
    1.6903
    kg/m³
    1.0552E-1 lb/ft³
    1.6335
    kg/m³
    1.0198E-1 lb/ft³
  • Heat capacity at constant pressure Cp
    5.2185E-1
    kJ/(kg.K)
    1.2473E-1 BTU/lb∙°F 521.853 J/kg∙K 1.2473E-1 kcal/kg∙K
    5.2165E-1
    kJ/(kg.K)
    1.2468E-1 BTU/lb∙°F 521.653 J/kg∙K 1.2468E-1 kcal/kg∙K
    5.2155E-1
    kJ/(kg.K)
    1.2465E-1 BTU/lb∙°F 521.553 J/kg∙K 1.2465E-1 kcal/kg∙K
  • Heat capacity at constant volume Cv
    3.1243E-1
    kJ/(kg.K)
    7.4673E-2 BTU/lb∙°F 312.431 J/kg∙K 7.4673E-2 kcal/kg∙K
    3.1241E-1
    kJ/(kg.K)
    7.4667E-2 BTU/lb∙°F 312.406 J/kg∙K 7.4667E-2 kcal/kg∙K
    3.1238E-1
    kJ/(kg.K)
    7.4661E-2 BTU/lb∙°F 312.381 J/kg∙K 7.4661E-2 kcal/kg∙K
  • Liquid (at boiling point)/gas equivalent
    782
    mol/mol
    825.53
    mol/mol
    854.24
    mol/mol
  • Solubility in water
    /
    3.025E-5
    mol/mol
    2.519E-5
    mol/mol
  • Specific gravity
    1.38
    1.38
    1.38
  • Specific volume
    5.607E-1
    m³/kg
    8.9815 ft³/lb
    5.916E-1
    m³/kg
    9.4765 ft³/lb
    6.122E-1
    m³/kg
    9.8065 ft³/lb
  • Thermal conductivity
    16.483
    mW/m∙K
    9.5301E-3 Btu/ft/h/°F 1.4182E-1 cal/hour∙cm∙°C 3.9395E-5 cal/s∙cm∙°C 1.6483E-2 W/(m∙K)
    17.245
    mW/m∙K
    9.9706E-3 Btu/ft/h/°F 1.4838E-1 cal/hour∙cm∙°C 4.1217E-5 cal/s∙cm∙°C 1.7245E-2 W/(m∙K)
    17.746
    mW/m∙K
    1.026E-2 Btu/ft/h/°F 1.5269E-1 cal/hour∙cm∙°C 4.2414E-5 cal/s∙cm∙°C 1.7746E-2 W/(m∙K)
  • Vapor pressure
    /
    /
    /
Ar
Argon

Liquid / Gas Volumes

Calculate a liquid or gas volume or a mass

Liquid Phase

At boiling point at 1.013 bar

m3(Volume)
kg(Mass)

Gas Phase

at 1.013 bar and boiling point

m3(Volume)
kg(Mass)
Ar
Argon

Applications

Examples of uses of this molecule in Industry and Healthcare

Aeronautics

Argon is used during welding and heat treatment operations as well as a protective atmosphere.

Aeronautics

Automotive

Argon is used pure or in mixtures for arc, plasma and laser welding. Argon protects welds against air as well as reduces fume emissions for most arc welding processes. Argon is used to inflate car airbags.

Automotive

Beverage

Argon is used to inert wine to prevent oxidation during winemaking.

Beverage

Metal fabrication

Argon is used to protect liquid metal from reactions with compounds present in ambient air, such as oxygen. It is also used for the same reasons in many welding processes.

Metal fabrication

Food

Argon allows to extend food shelf life with modified atmosphere.

Food

Glass

Argon avoids corrosion of the tungsten filament in light bulb and consequently blackening of the bulb by atmosphere inerting. Argon is used to increase thermal isolation performance of double glazing windows.

Glass

Hospital care

Medical device: liquid argon is used for cryoablation in surgery; ie the tissues are destroyed through intense cold. Argon is also used in argon plasma coagulation (APC), a medical endoscopic procedure used primarily to control bleeding.

Hospital care

Laboratories & Research Centers

Argon is used for analysis and quality control for industry and hospital: plasma gas for plasma emission spectrometry, blanket gas in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, carrier gas in gas chromatography for various detectors. In mixture with methane, argon is used in Geiger counter and in X-ray fluorescence detector as quenching gas.

Laboratories & Research Centers

Metal

Argon is used for stirring and inerting purposes in steelmaking and during the Argon Oxygen Decarburisation (AOD) operation for stainless steel.

Metal

Electronic components

Argon is used to carry reactive molecules to the reaction area, protect semiconductors against impurities, provide an inert atmosphere to grow crystals of silicon and germanium. Argon also intervenes under ionic state for sputtering, ion implantation, annealing and etching processes in semiconductor or high performance material manufacturing. It eases the creation of a ionic state inside the reaction area. It is also used to bring a molecules mix to a given mixture ratio.

Electronic components
Ar
Argon

Safety

Information to safely use this molecule

  • Major hazards
  • Material compatibility
  • GHS04
    Gas under pressure

Odor

none

Metals

  • Aluminium
    Satisfactory
  • Brass
    Satisfactory
  • Monel
    Satisfactory
  • Copper
    Satisfactory
  • Ferritic Steel
    Satisfactory
  • Stainless steel
    Satisfactory
  • Zinc
    Satisfactory
  • Titanium
    no data

Plastics

  • Polytetrafluoroethylene
    Satisfactory
  • Polychlorotrifluoroethylene
    Satisfactory
  • Polyvinylidene fluoride
    Satisfactory
  • Polyvinyl chloride
    Satisfactory
  • Ethylene tetrafluoroethylene
    Satisfactory
  • Polycarbonate
    Satisfactory
  • Polyamide
    Satisfactory
  • Polypropylene
    Satisfactory

Elastomers

  • Buthyl (isobutene- isoprene) rubber
    Satisfactory
  • Nitrile rubber
    Satisfactory
  • Chloroprene
    Satisfactory
  • Chlorofluorocarbons
    Satisfactory
  • Silicon
    Satisfactory
  • Perfluoroelastomers
    Satisfactory
  • Fluoroelastomers
    Satisfactory
  • Nitrile rubber
    Satisfactory
  • Neoprene
    Satisfactory
  • Polyurethane
    Satisfactory
  • Ethylene-Propylene
    Satisfactory

Lubricants

  • Hydrocarbon based lubricant
    Satisfactory
  • Fluorocarbon based lubricant
    Satisfactory

Materials compatibility

Recommendations : Air Liquide has gathered data on the compatibility of gases with materials to assist you in evaluating which materials to use for a gas system. Although the information has been compiled from what Air Liquide believes are reliable sources (International Standards: Compatibility of cylinder and valve materials with gas content; Part 1- Metallic materials: ISO11114-1 (March 2012), Part 2 - Non-metallic materials: ISO11114-2 (April 2013), it must be used with extreme caution and engineering judgement. No raw data such as these can cover all conditions of concentration, temperature, humidity, impurities and aeration. It is therefore recommended that this table is only used to identify possible materials for applications at high pressure and ambient temperature. Extensive investigation and testing under the specific conditions of use need to be carried out to validate a material selection for a given application. Contact the regional Air Liquide team for expertise service.

Ar
Argon

Learn More

General information

More information

Argon was discovered in 1894 by Sir William Ramsay and Lord John Rayleigh. The name argon comes from the Greek "αργόν" (argos) meaning "the lazy one" in reference to its chemical inactivity. Argon exists only in the atmosphere. Air contains about 0.9 % of argon, a neutral and colorless gas. Argon is highly used in industrial applications due to its high level of chemical inertness. Argon is produced through air cryogenic distillation.